Personal finance

FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, file photo, economist Arthur Laffer, known as the "father of supply-side economics" and who was an economic advisor to President Ronald Reagan, speaks to an executive committee meeting of the California Republican Party at their convention in Anaheim, Calif. In their effort to overhaul the U.S. tax code, President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are betting that by slashing taxes on corporations and rich people, the money diverted from the U.S. Treasury will find its way into the pockets of ordinary Americans. “It will increase real wages and it will increase them substantially,’’ says Laffer. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
November 17, 2017 - 3:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Does money roll downhill? In their drive to cut taxes, President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are betting it does. Behind their legislation is a theory long popular among conservatives: Slash taxes for corporations and rich people, who will then hire, invest and...
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FILE - In this June 17, 2017 file photo, Rep. Luke Messer, R-Ind., appears on Capitol Hill in Washington. Messer is running for Senate in Indiana, though he primarily lives with his family in suburban Washington. It could complicate his plans to win the Republican primary and unseat Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly next year. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
November 17, 2017 - 11:04 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A campaign stop for Rep. Luke Messer in his bid for Senate involves traveling from his family's home in suburban Washington back to Indiana, where aides say he typically stays overnight with his mom. Although living outside the state is hardly a first for members of Indiana's...
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President Donald Trump answers a question from the press about discussion of the tax bill, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Trump is at the Capitol for a pep rally with House Republicans, shortly before the chamber is expected to approve the tax bill over solid Democratic opposition. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 17, 2017 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans have stretched closer to delivering the first big legislative victory for President Donald Trump and their party, whisking a $1.5 trillion overhaul of business and personal income taxes through the House. Thorny problems await in the Senate, though. The House passage...
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November 17, 2017 - 3:11 am
The House passed a nearly $1.5 trillion tax bill that differs from legislation approved by the Senate Finance Committee. A comparison of the Republican-written measures: —Personal income tax rates: House bill condenses current seven brackets to four: 12, 25, 35 and 39.6 percent. Senate measure...
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President Donald Trump answers a question from the press about discussion of the tax bill, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Trump is at the Capitol for a pep rally with House Republicans, shortly before the chamber is expected to approve the tax bill over solid Democratic opposition. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
November 16, 2017 - 10:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans rammed a $1.5 trillion overhaul of business and personal income taxes through the House Thursday, edging toward the code's biggest rewrite in three decades and the first major legislative triumph for President Donald Trump and the GOP after 10 bumpy months of...
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President Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he walks with Vice President Mike Pence as he departs Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017. Trump urged House Republicans Thursday to approve a near $1.5 trillion tax overhaul as the party prepared to drive the measure through the House. Across the Capitol, Democrats pointed to new numbers showing the Senate version of the plan would boost taxes on lower and middle-income Americans. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 16, 2017 - 8:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on House consideration of the tax overhaul (all times local): 8:20 p.m. Vice President Mike Pence says "now the ball is in the Senate's court," after the House voted Thursday to approve a $1.5 trillion overhaul of the nation's tax code. At the Tax Foundation's 80th...
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November 16, 2017 - 10:43 am
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — For over a decade, Charles Crenshaw has been paying his ex-wife tens of thousands of dollars annually in alimony. The now-retired engineer is hoping to renegotiate the agreement for lower payments, but he's waiting first to see what comes of a tax reform proposal in Congress...
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In this Nov. 13, 2017, photo, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, arrives as the tax-writing panel begins work on overhauling the nation's tax code, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Millions would forgo coverage if Congress repeals the unpopular requirement that Americans get health insurance, gambling with their own wellbeing and boosting premiums for others. Just as important, the drive by GOP senators to undo “Obamacare’s” coverage requirement fits in with Trump administration efforts to write regulations allowing for plans with limited benefits and lower premiums. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
November 16, 2017 - 3:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions are expected to forgo coverage if Congress repeals the unpopular requirement that Americans get health insurance, gambling that they won't get sick and boosting premiums for others. The drive by Senate Republicans to undo the coverage requirement under former President...
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Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., points to boxes of petitions supporting the Republican tax reform bill that is set for a vote later this week as he arrives for a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
November 15, 2017 - 10:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Wisconsin's Ron Johnson on Wednesday became the first Republican senator to say he opposes his party's tax bill, signaling potential problems for GOP leaders. Passage of a similar package seemed certain Thursday in the House, where a handful of dissidents conceded they expected to...
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Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, joins Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., left, and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., to talk about work on overhauling the nation's tax code, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
November 15, 2017 - 9:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Republican tax overhaul legislation (all times local): 9:50 p.m. A new tax break for businesses that give their workers paid family leave has been put into the Senate Republican tax bill now moving toward approval. The proposal by Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb., was...
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