Drug addiction

FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2016, file photo, Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre is shown during a halftime ceremony of an NFL football game against the Dallas Cowboys, in Green Bay, Wis. Favre says he made three trips to rehabilitation centers to fight his dependence on painkillers and alcohol. Sports Illustrated reports that Favre says he took as many as 14 Vicodin at one time during his MVP season of 1995. The former Green Bay Packers star said “that year, when I woke up in the morning, my first thought was, ‘I gotta get more pills.’ “(AP Photo/Matt Ludtke, File)
May 22, 2018 - 4:05 pm
GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Retired quarterback Brett Favre says he made three trips to rehabilitation centers during his Hall of Fame career to fight his dependence on painkillers and alcohol. Favre told Sports Illustrated he took as many as 14 Vicodin at one time during the 1995 season in Green Bay...
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This undated photo provided by US WorldMeds shows Lucemyra. Federal regulators have approved the first nonopioid treatment to ease withdrawal symptoms from quitting opioids. (US WorldMeds via AP)
May 16, 2018 - 6:21 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Federal regulators have approved the first nonopioid treatment to ease withdrawal symptoms from quitting addictive opioids. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration expedited approval of Lucemyra (luc-eh-MEER'-eh) to help combat the U.S. opioid epidemic. The tablet was approved...
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George Barrett, left, executive chairman of the board, Cardinal Health, Inc., Dr. Joseph Mastandrea, chairman of the board, Miami-Luken, Inc., John Hammergren, chairman, president, and CEO, McKesson Corporation, J. Christopher Smith, former president and CEO, H.D. Smith Wholesale Drug Company, and Steven Collis, chairman, president, and CEO, AmerisourceBergen Corporation, are sworn in before they testify during a hearing of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, about the opioid epidemic, on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, May 8, 2018 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 08, 2018 - 3:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Top executives of the nation's leading wholesale drug distributors told Congress under oath Tuesday that their companies didn't help cause the nation's deadly opioid epidemic, drawing bipartisan wrath that included one lawmaker suggesting prison terms for some company officials...
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In this April 26, 2018 photo, David Humes stands outside Legislative Hall, the state capitol building, in Dover, Del. Humes, whose son died from a heroin overdose in 2012, has been pushing for an opioid tax in Delaware, which did not increase funding for addiction treatment in 2017 as it struggles to balance its budget. “When you think about the fact that each year more people are dying, if you leave the money the same, you’re not keeping up with this public health crisis,” he said. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)nydi
April 28, 2018 - 3:40 pm
ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Facing a rising death toll from drug overdoses, state lawmakers across the country are testing a strategy to boost treatment for opioid addicts: Force drug manufacturers and their distributors to pay for it. Bills introduced in at least 15 states would impose taxes or fees on...
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April 26, 2018 - 5:16 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — CNN's medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta has taken the unusual step of publicly urging Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reconsider his opposition to medical marijuana, particularly as a way to fight the opioid epidemic. Gupta wrote a public letter to Sessions, saying that he...
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FILE - In this March 7, 2017, file photo, the CEO of a methadone clinic holds a 35 mg liquid dose of methadone in Rossville, Ga. The drug is the oldest and most effective of approved medications used to treat opioid addiction, but Medicare doesn’t cover it. (AP Photo/Kevin D. Liles, File)
April 24, 2018 - 10:23 am
One in three older Americans with Medicare drug coverage is prescribed opioid painkillers, but for those who develop a dangerous addiction there is one treatment Medicare won't cover: methadone. Methadone is the oldest, and experts say, the most effective of the three approved medications used to...
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In this image made from surveillance video provided Thursday, April 19, 2018, by the Carver County Sheriff's Office, as part of an investigative file into Prince's death, the superstar, center, enters a clinic of Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg on April 20, 2016, the day before he was found dead of an accidental fentanyl overdose. The doctor is not facing criminal charges and his attorney says he had no role in Prince's death. (Carver County Sheriff's Office via AP)
April 19, 2018 - 8:19 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prince thought he was taking a common painkiller but instead ingested a counterfeit pill containing the dangerously powerful drug fentanyl, a Minnesota prosecutor said Thursday as he announced that no charges would be filed in the musician's death. Carver County Attorney Mark...
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April 18, 2018 - 12:47 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors in the Minnesota county where Prince died said Wednesday that they're ready to make an announcement in their two-year investigation into the musician's death from an accidental fentanyl overdose. Carver County Attorney Mark Metz was scheduled to announce at 11:30 a.m...
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In this April, 11, 2018, photo, Dr. Deborah Richter, a family medicine and addiction treatment doctor, talks with a reporter at the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt. Deep within President Donald Trump’s plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It’s a rare instance in which Trump is building on Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together. Richter, says medications have helped her patients, especially when combined with counseling. “People got back to what they were before the addiction seized them,” she said. As a doctor, “it was on a personal level so rewarding to save other mothers’ children.” (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)
April 16, 2018 - 6:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep within President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying roll back Obama administration...
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April 09, 2018 - 12:24 pm
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — An expanded program to treat prisoners for opioid addiction helped lower the number of accidental drug overdose deaths in Rhode Island in 2017 after years of steady increases, state health officials said. The roughly 4 percent decrease in accidental overdose deaths...
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