Diseases and conditions

May 24, 2018 - 9:47 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A man who has been on California's death row for more than three decades can't be executed because he's intellectually disabled, the state's highest court ruled Thursday. In a unanimous decision, the California Supreme Court overturned the death sentence of Robert Lewis Jr.,...
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FILE - This April 15, 2011, file photo, shows a bottle of Johnson's baby powder. A Southern California jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay more than $25 million to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder. Jurors on Thursday, May 24, 2018, awarded $4 million in punitive damages after finding that Johnson & Johnson acted with "malice, oppression or fraud." (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
May 24, 2018 - 6:30 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A California jury delivered a $25.7 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit brought by a woman who claimed she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder. Jurors in Los Angeles recommended $4 million in punitive damages Thursday after...
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Dr. Mae Dolendo, of the Philippines, talks about the expansion of a global outreach program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital on Thursday, May 24, 2018, in Memphis, Tenn. The hospital said that among several other nations, it is building relations in Russia, Myanmar, Cambodia and sub-Saharan Africa. Its research has already affected the Philippines, where Dolendo treats children with cancer in Davao City on the island of Mindanao. (AP Photo/Adrian Sainz)
May 24, 2018 - 4:50 pm
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has helped with the treatment of thousands of cancer-stricken children around the world. Striving to reach so many more, the Memphis, Tennessee-based hospital announced a $100 million plan Thursday to expand its global outreach. President...
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FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2017 file photo, workers dig a new grave at a church cemetery in New Vienna, Iowa. Preliminary data released on Wednesday, May 23, 2018 shows U.S. death rates rose again last year, indicating that 2017 likely will mark the third straight decline in American life expectancy. (Dave Kettering/Telegraph Herald via AP)
May 23, 2018 - 3:34 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. death rate rose last year, and 2017 likely will mark the third straight year of decline in American life expectancy, according to preliminary data. Death rates rose for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, flu and pneumonia, and three other leading causes of death, according to...
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Yulia Skripal poses for the media during an interview in n London, Wednesday May 23, 2018. Yulia Skripal says recovery has been slow and painful, in first interview since nerve agent poisoning. (Dylan Martinez/Pool via AP)
May 23, 2018 - 3:13 pm
LONDON (AP) — Yulia Skripal, who was poisoned with her ex-spy father in a nerve agent attack, said Wednesday her recovery has been "slow and painful," and that she hopes to return to her home in Russia someday. In her first appearance on camera since the poisoning that sent U.K.-Russia tensions...
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FILE - In this May 11, 2018 file photo President Donald Trump speaks during an event about prescription drug prices with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, file)
May 23, 2018 - 3:06 pm
GENEVA (AP) — President Donald Trump's top health official said Wednesday that the U.S. and global partners will "take the steps necessary" to try to contain a new Ebola outbreak, asserting that the fight against infectious diseases is one of the administration's top priorities for the World Health...
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In this May 22, 2018, photo, schoolchildren wash their hands to help contain the Ebola outbreak before entering a classroom in the north-western city of Mbandaka, in Congo. Congo's health ministry announced six new confirmed Ebola cases and two new suspected cases Tuesday as vaccinations entered a second day in an effort to contain the deadly virus in the city of more than 1 million. (Mark Naftalin/UNICEF via AP)
May 23, 2018 - 11:55 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Two infected patients who fled from an Ebola treatment center in a Congo city of 1.2 million people later died, an aid group said Wednesday while asserting that "forced hospitalization is not the solution to this epidemic." As the number of suspected Ebola cases continued to...
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In this photo taken Sunday, May 20, 2018, a team from Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) dons protective clothing and equipment as they prepare to treat Ebola patients in an isolation ward of Mbandaka hospital in Congo. Congo's health ministry announced Tuesday, May 22, 2018 six new confirmed cases of the Ebola virus and two new suspected cases while a vaccination effort enters its second day. (Louise Annaud/Medecins Sans Frontieres via AP)
May 22, 2018 - 6:13 pm
KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Congo's health ministry announced six new confirmed Ebola cases and two new suspected cases Tuesday as vaccinations entered a second day in an effort to contain the deadly virus in a city of more than 1 million. Dozens of health workers in the northwestern provincial capital...
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FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2016, file photo, Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre is shown during a halftime ceremony of an NFL football game against the Dallas Cowboys, in Green Bay, Wis. Favre says he made three trips to rehabilitation centers to fight his dependence on painkillers and alcohol. Sports Illustrated reports that Favre says he took as many as 14 Vicodin at one time during his MVP season of 1995. The former Green Bay Packers star said “that year, when I woke up in the morning, my first thought was, ‘I gotta get more pills.’ “(AP Photo/Matt Ludtke, File)
May 22, 2018 - 4:05 pm
GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Retired quarterback Brett Favre says he made three trips to rehabilitation centers during his Hall of Fame career to fight his dependence on painkillers and alcohol. Favre told Sports Illustrated he took as many as 14 Vicodin at one time during the 1995 season in Green Bay...
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In this April 13, 2018, photo Josephine Rizo sits in her home with her stack of bills from her ongoing battle with cancer in Phoenix. As treatment costs soar and insurance coverage shrinks, hospitals and patient advocates around the U.S. are rushing to offer more help to patients like Rizo, who had no financial counseling. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
May 22, 2018 - 3:34 pm
Josephine Rizo survived chemotherapy, surgery and radiation, but breast cancer treatment wrecked her finances. Money was already tight when doctors told the Phoenix resident she had an aggressive form of the disease. Then she took a pay cut after going on disability leave, and eventually lost her...
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