Health

Patrick Kelly, Field Operations Manager with Mosquito Mate, releases Wolbachia-infected male mosquitoes, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, in South Miami, Fla. Thousands of bacteria-infected mosquitoes are flying near Miami to test a new way to suppress insect populations that carry Zika and other viruses. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
February 08, 2018 - 3:40 pm
SOUTH MIAMI, Fla. (AP) — Mosquitoes are a year-round downside to living in subtropical Miami, but millions of bacteria-infected mosquitoes flying in a suburban neighborhood are being hailed as an innovation that may kill off more bugs that spread Zika and other viruses. Miami-Dade County Mosquito...
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People stroll in the snow covered park of the Chateau de Versailles, west of Paris, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018. Heavy snowfall has caused travel disruptions in the northern half of France and in Paris as the weather conditions caught authorities off guard. Due to the weather conditions, the Park and the Gardens were closed in the morning and reopened early afternoon Thursday. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
February 08, 2018 - 2:00 pm
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — How safe is it to eat snow? A Romanian university has published the results of just such a study. The 2017 experiment showed it was safe to eat snow that was a half-day old, and safer to eat it in the colder months. But by two days old, the snow is not safe to eat, Istvan...
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FILe - In this Sept. 19, 2005 file photo, Matthew Roberts of Three Doors Down performs at halftime of the New York Giants New Orleans Saints game in East Rutherford, N.J. The family of Roberts, who died of a drug overdose in 2016, says in a lawsuit that an Alabama doctor fueled the musician’s opioid addiction. In a lawsuit filed recently in Alabama, Roberts’ family says Dr. Richard Snellgrove began prescribing high levels of opioids to the musician in 2006 and continued doing so until days before he died. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File)
February 08, 2018 - 1:55 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — The family of a longtime guitarist for 3 Doors Down is accusing an Alabama doctor of fueling the rocker's opioid addiction before he died of a drug overdose. Matthew Roberts, 38, was found dead in August 2016 in the hallway of a hotel outside Milwaukee, where he was to perform in a...
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February 08, 2018 - 11:23 am
CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) — Authorities in Guinea announced the first death from Lassa fever in more than two decades Thursday, heightening anxiety about another hemorrhagic fever in the West African country where an Ebola epidemic first emerged. The Ebola outbreak in late 2013 went on to kill more than...
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February 08, 2018 - 12:00 am
88-year-old man who tried to kill wife with hammer sentenced AP FACT CHECK: EPA chief sees good in warming, experts don't Insulin quality questions have diabetes experts scrambling Scientists aim at joint injuries that can trigger arthritis Romanian study: Half-day old snow is safe to eat...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
February 07, 2018 - 6:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has championed the continued burning of fossil fuels while...
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In this Dec. 15, 2017 photo, the HealthCare.gov website is photographed in Washington. A new tally by The Associated Press finds that nearly 11.8 million Americans have signed up for coverage this year under former President Barack Obama’s health care law. That’s only about 3 percent less than last year, remarkably stable despite President Donald Trump’s repeated efforts to repeal or undercut the program. The Affordable Care Act offers subsidized private health insurance to people who don’t have coverage on the job. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
February 07, 2018 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the political equivalent of a death-defying escape: former President Barack Obama's health care law pulled in nearly 11.8 million customers for 2018, despite the Republican campaign to erase it from the books. An Associated Press count found that nationwide enrollment was...
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February 07, 2018 - 3:31 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A top University of Connecticut dental school professor was reprimanded over a selfie showing him and several students with two severed heads used for medical research, according to a document obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press. The November letter by R. Lamont...
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FILE - In this September 2008 file photo, a physician discusses an ankle injury with a patient in Lawrence, Kan. Arthritis isn't always from the wear-and-tear of getting older _ too often, younger people get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. According to a study released Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, researchers are hunting for a new way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. (Mike Yoder/The Lawrence Journal-World via AP)
February 07, 2018 - 2:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Arthritis isn't always from the wear and tear of getting older — younger adults too often get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. Now researchers are hunting a way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. University of...
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In this Jan. 30, 2018, photo Pharmacist and researcher Alan Carter poses for a photo in Kansas City, Mo. Carter raised a stir with his recently published study finding that a variety of insulin vials he tested seemed to hold far less of the life-saving hormone than they should. Carter and colleagues did the testing in the labs of contract researcher MRIGlobal, where he worked until recently. Diabetes groups says Carter's study is flawed, but to reassure patients, they're organizing a much bigger study they expect will refute his findings. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
February 07, 2018 - 2:39 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Preliminary research suggesting that some diabetes patients may be injecting medicine that has partially disintegrated is causing concern even as serious questions are raised about the research itself. The study author, a pharmacist, bought vials of insulin at a number of...
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